Word on Fire Book Club Bundle

Sold out
  • Word on Fire Book Club Bundle
  • Word on Fire Book Club Bundle

Word on Fire Book Club Bundle

Sold out

Get the next 3 books in a bundle for 40% off!

Flannery O'Connor Collection

Dig into the rich tradition of Catholic literature with these significant and influential books recommended by Bishop Barron. These titles have transformed cultures and have proven indispensable to those seeking to encounter God, as revealed in Jesus Christ through His Church.

The books are each elegantly bound and include a ribbon bookmark and a foreword and charcoal sketch of the book's author by Bishop Barron!

You will not only enrich your life with these works, you'll be proud to display these gorgeous editions in your home or office.

"As becomes unmistakably clear as you read through this collection, Flannery O’Connor was not only a masterful teller of tales; she was also one of the most perceptive literary theorists of the twentieth century. She once famously defined herself as a “hillbilly Thomist,” and the aesthetics of St. Thomas Aquinas do indeed inform the way she thought about her own work. "

- Bishop Barron

Thomas Aquinas: Spiritual Master

Thomas Aquinas is widely considered the greatest and most influential of Catholic theologians. Yet too often his insights into the nature of God and the meaning of life are seen as somehow cold, impersonal, and divorced from spirituality. In this award-winning book, Bishop Robert Barron shows how Aquinas’ profound understanding of the Christian mystical life animates and helps explain his writings on Jesus Christ, creation, God’s “strange” nature, and the human call to ecstasy.

“When one interprets Thomas merely as a rationalist philosopher or theologian, one misses the burning heart of everything he wrote. Aquinas was a saint deeply in love with Jesus Christ, and the image of Christ pervades the entire edifice that is his philosophical, theological, and scriptural work. Above all, Thomas Aquinas was a consummate spiritual master, holding up the icon of the Word made flesh and inviting others into its transformative power.”

After Humanity and Abolition of Man

After Humanity is a guide to one of C.S. Lewis’s most widely admired but least accessible works, The Abolition of Man, which originated as a series of lectures on ethics that he delivered during the Second World War.

These lectures tackle the thorny question of whether moral value is objective or not. When we say something is right or wrong, are we recognizing a reality outside ourselves, or merely reporting a subjective sentiment? Lewis addresses the matter from a purely philosophical standpoint, leaving theological matters to one side. He makes a powerful case against subjectivism, issuing an intellectual warning that, in our “post-truth” twenty-first century, has even more relevance than when he originally presented it.

Lewis characterized The Abolition of Man as “almost my favourite among my books,” and his biographer Walter Hooper has called it “an all but indispensable introduction to the entire corpus of Lewisiana.” In After Humanity, Michael Ward sheds much-needed light on this important but difficult work, explaining both its general academic context and the particular circumstances in Lewis’s life that helped give rise to it, including his front-line service in the trenches of the First World War.

After Humanity contains a detailed commentary clarifying the many allusions and quotations scattered throughout Lewis’s argument. It shows how this resolutely philosophical thesis fits in with his other, more explicitly Christian works. It also includes a full-color photo gallery, displaying images of people, places, and documents that relate to The Abolition of Man, among them Lewis’s original “blurb” for the book, which has never before been published.